writers

Stan Lee

Even if you haven’t heard of Stan Lee, or Stanley Martin Lieber, you’re probably familiar with his work. He was the creative force behind many of Marvel’s iconic superheroes, including Spider-Man, Iron Man, the Hulk, and Black Panther (to name just a few).

Sadly, he passed recently at the age of 95, but not without leaving behind a legacy. Stan was a man of charisma and humor who breathed a new sort of life into the fiction characters he worked on. Unlike some comic writers, who focused more on the incredible powers of their superheroes, Stan chose instead to highlight their human side, letting their weaknesses and faults stand out as their defining characteristic.

I had the pleasure of meeting Stan at my work some years ago and he was as friendly and energetic as ever. Even though the project we were working on with him didn’t end up going anywhere, he showed a good deal of enthusiasm for it. I got the impression he brought that same excitement to all of his creative undertakings. As a side note: I always thought that he and my grandpa looked alike, though they had dissimilar personalities.

Stan has been known to make cameo appearances (usually humorous in nature) in most of the recent Marvel films. I appreciated that he always seemed to be having fun and loved what he was doing. He didn’t take himself too seriously, but he was serious about his work.

An editor friend of mine sent me an article with some quotes from Stan. It seemed like a good final word from the man himself and a great representation of his outlook on life. Most of his advice could be applied to any creative field.

I hope you enjoy these 17 nuggets of wisdom from Mr. Excelsior himself.

17 Must-Read Screenwriting Lessons From Stan Lee

Con-unity

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This summer, I attended a Christian writers conference called Realm Makers. It wasn’t the first Christian conference I’d been to, but it was my first writers con.

In short, it turned out even better than I had expected (not that I had a lot of expectations going in, good or bad). I met many a fine folk and gleaned quite a bit from the seminars and panels I attended. I boarded the plane home feeling rejuvenated and restored. Plus, I have a few new books and a bunch of new friends now.

There is something to be said about being around creative people with similar goals, mindsets, and experiences to your own. The sense of belonging I felt there was wonderful. It was a little like being home but with 300 people I’d never met before.

Generally, while out in public I have my guard up. Now, I’m a rather friendly guy, but I operate with a sense that most people I’ll meet don’t truly understand or resonate with where I’m coming from. Meeting someone I have a strong affinity with doesn’t happen often, even at other conferences and conventions I’ve gone to.

This event was an exception. Not a single person I talked to felt like a stranger, despite how different our personalities, backgrounds, and even appearance might have been. There was a connection, a feeling that, on some level, this person gets me, they’ve dealt with (and maybe still are dealing with) some of the same struggles I have.

Creatives, if you can find a place and people such as that—people who you can truly identify with—I highly recommend you make a strong effort to attend. Yes, such things can be expensive (besides just the registration, there’s travel, accommodations, and a time commitment). Despite my severe lack of sleep during the con, I felt refreshed by the end.

It’s healthy to live and work around people who have a different outlook and walk of life than your own, rather than living in an echo chamber of people who all sound the same. But it sure helps to take the occasional opportunity to refocus your creative energy as you glide along, squawking merrily with some birds of a feather at your side. 

Oh, did I mention we ended the whole shebang with an epic Nerf gun war? Totes awesome. And the sweet pair of mugs I won in a raffle didn’t hurt neither!