creative types

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No, despite what the title may have you believe, this isn’t a post about fonts. You’ll need to find a professional typographer if you want one of those.

However, this is much more fun.

You’ve probably seen those online personality tests that tell you what type of person you are, like what Disney princess you most identify with or something like that. Yeah, I finally saw Wreck it Ralph Breaks the Internet. Fun movie at that.

Well, someone shared this on a Facebook writing group I participate in and I gotta say, it’s pretty cool. Even if you care not for such quizzes, the visuals alone are worth the journey.

So, enjoy this brief and splendid test brought to you by Adobe Create Magazine.

Creative Types


If you’re curious, you can find descriptions for all the creative personalities right here.

So, what were you? And do you feel like it’s accurate?

According to the test, I’m The Visionary. It seems right, or at least pretty close to the mark. I mean, let’s face it, us creative types don’t adhere to labels, amiright?

mindset

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I may have mentioned this a time or two before, but the way you view something can really impact your behavior. This is just as true when you’re learning something new.

Along those lines, I got this email from a health coach friend of mine, Jennifer Brown, who works for OPTAVIA. I enjoyed the content and thought it was more than worth passing on, so here it is:

Growth vs. Fixed Mindset

According to a Stanford University study, researcher and psychology professor Carol Dweck, demonstrates that people cultivate one of two mindsets in a learning experience. In a fixed mindset, people believe that their qualities are innate and unable to change. They also believe that pure talent leads to success with no effort required.

On the other hand, those that have a growth mindset believe that learning and intelligence can improve with time and experience. They believe that their effort has a direct impact on their success, so they are usually more willing to put in the time and work since they believe that their abilities are just the starting point for potential.

It’s important to develop a growth mindset to realize your ability to succeed, no matter what obstacle you may face. It can also have a positive impact on your self-esteem and relationships. Here are some tips for developing a growth mindset:


View challenges as opportunities.
 Embrace challenges as an opportunity to learn and grow. The more we challenge ourselves to achieve a healthier lifestyle, the more opportunities we open up for ourselves.

  1. Choose learning over approval. If we’re more concerned with getting acceptance from others, we lose perspective on the real benefits for reaching our goal. It’s important to focus on improving ourselves for our own benefit to increase our growth potential.

  2. Focus on the process. Major change usually does not happen overnight, so it’s important to be realistic about the timeline for reaching our goals. Implementing new, healthy habits in the learning process will make them more likely to stick over time.

  3. Reward your effort. Set mini milestone goals to reward yourself for all of the effort and progress that you’ve made along your journey. For example, if you’ve stuck to a healthy sleep schedule for two consecutive weeks, treat yourself to a massage or movie date with a friend or loved one.

  4. Reflect on your learning. Journaling is a great way to reflect on the new lessons you’ve learned. Keep track of healthy tips and also document your physical and emotional feelings to allow the lessons to sink in. This can help identify what is working well or if there are any changes that need to be made. 

attention

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In the past, I’ve made a big deal about focus and how important it is to maintain. I still stand by my words. Or most of them anyway, generally in the same order they were written.

That said, research is showing a particular quality of creative people: something called a leaky attention. I know, sounds kinda messy.

Apparently, the propensity to shift attention often can lead to more creative thought. It makes sense to me;  creativity often means noticing the things other people ignore. And most creatives I’ve met are pretty easily distracted.

Hey what’s that over there?

Whether it’s noticing the sound of a paper bag crunching underfoot, a particular shade of blue painted on the wall, an unusual bug crawling across the table, or the fact that the man in the purple trench coat has been following you for the last three blocks—creatives have a special ability to take in their surroundings and use it toward a creative act.

But there’s a catch, this leaky attention can also become a hindrance when attempting to actually produce creative work, it can distract you from finishing the work itself—or even getting started for that matter. Hey, someone should write a course on how to overcome that. Wink wink, nudge nudge, say no more.

As the Psychology Today article points out:

Artistic creativity is a delicate balance of spontaneity and deliberation. 

I’ve found this to be true in my own life. There is a time to be open, to breathe in the inspiration around you. But once that spark has ignited a flame, you must nourish and protect it. You must concentrate your efforts on building that flame into a bonfire, sheltering it from the winds of distraction. Like a vacuum cleaner, you’ve gotta flip the switch from intake to output. However, unlike my metaphors, fires and vacuums don’t mix. You can take my word on that one.

There are times when it’s best to pay attention and times when you’re better off taking a rain check on it. It takes time and practice to learn the difference. Still, there’s nothing keeping you from trying it now.

But first, I recommend ditching that trench-coated creeper on your trail. Based on his fashion sense, he’s either up to no good or he’s a distant relative of Grimace. Either way, not one to be trusted.

And here’s the link to that article one more time:

The Cognitive Balancing Act of Creativity

childhood dreams

Have you seen Randy Pausch’s Last Lecture

The video has been around for a while, but I just saw it for the first time recently. As a guy who works in the digital gaming industry and at a studio that has been part of multiple VR projects, this is right up my alley.

But even if you care not for such things, this final lecture is more than worth watching. In it, Randy talks about achieving his childhood dream, helping others achieve theirs, and what he’s learned in the process.

He also shares some great insights into brick walls and head fakes. I guess head fakery and walls of brick don’t usually go well together, but they’re great here!

I’m sad Randy isn’t still around, but I think you’ll agree the world is a better place for having had a guy like him in it.

Check it out, why don’t ya.

the elements of style

After having heard many recommendations, I finally purchased and read Strunk and White’s book, The Elements of Style.

If you write at all, in any capacity, this is a must-read.

Not only is it incredibly short, clever, and to the point, it also has some insightful thoughts on writing itself—some of which impacted me greatly.

Sure, it’s not the final word on proper writing and even I disagreed with some of the points (this from a rather agreeable guy), but it’s a great overview of the essentials. I expect I’ll return to it often.

Allow me to share just a few excerpts that I found striking:


“Writing, to be effective, must follow closely the thoughts of the writer, but not necessarily in the order in which those thoughts occur. … The first principle of composition, therefore, is to force or determine the shape of what is to come and pursue that shape. … The more clearly the writer perceives the shape, the better are the chances of success.”

 

“Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.”

“All writers, by the way they use the language, reveal something of their spirits, their habits, their capacities, and their biases. This is inevitable as well as enjoyable. All writing is communication; creative writing is communication through revelation—it is Self escaping into the open. No writer long remains incognito.”

“Writing is, for most, laborious and slow. The mind travels faster than the pen; consequently, writing becomes a question of learning to make occasional wing shots, bringing down the bird of thought as it flashes by.”

“A careful and honest writer does not need to worry about style. As you become proficient in the use of language, your style will emerge, because you yourself will emerge, and when this happens you will find it incredibly easy to break through the barriers that separate you from other minds, other hearts—which is, of course, the purpose of writing, as well as its principal reward. Fortunately, the act of composition, or creation, disciplines the mind; writing is one way to go about thinking, and the practice and habit of writing not only drain the mind but supply it, too.” 

mediocre

Have you ever felt like your hobbies weren’t good enough? Or maybe you considered starting a new hobby but never began because the bar for excellence seemed way out of reach.

If so, it’s a downright shame.

Personally, I’ve taken on many-a hobby over the years, some to a greater extent than others, but I’ve found all of them rewarding in their own ways. 

I dove into the fine craft of painting miniatures just so I could have nice figures for a board game that a friend had given me. It’s not something I plan to do again, but I was happy with the outcome and glad to have a deeper understanding of the process.

Lately, I’ve been trying my hand at piano. As is often the case for a skill with a broad spectrum of talent, I began thinking, “hey, I’m not too bad at this!” and quickly shifted to, “oh, this is super hard, I don’t know if I’ll ever get very good.”

But you know what? I still enjoy hitting those keys and making some kind of sound that isn’t totally terrible. Right now, I’m just happy if I can go through one full scale, back to front, without messing up the fingering.

All this to say, you should check out this article by Tim Wu 

In Praise of Mediocrity

In it, he makes a strong case for not only having a hobby, but also enjoying it regardless of your skill level.

I tend to agree; it takes a lot of the pressure off and makes things more fun that way. After all isn’t that what a hobby should be all about?

Stan Lee

Even if you haven’t heard of Stan Lee, or Stanley Martin Lieber, you’re probably familiar with his work. He was the creative force behind many of Marvel’s iconic superheroes, including Spider-Man, Iron Man, the Hulk, and Black Panther (to name just a few).

Sadly, he passed recently at the age of 95, but not without leaving behind a legacy. Stan was a man of charisma and humor who breathed a new sort of life into the fiction characters he worked on. Unlike some comic writers, who focused more on the incredible powers of their superheroes, Stan chose instead to highlight their human side, letting their weaknesses and faults stand out as their defining characteristic.

I had the pleasure of meeting Stan at my work some years ago and he was as friendly and energetic as ever. Even though the project we were working on with him didn’t end up going anywhere, he showed a good deal of enthusiasm for it. I got the impression he brought that same excitement to all of his creative undertakings. As a side note: I always thought that he and my grandpa looked alike, though they had dissimilar personalities.

Stan has been known to make cameo appearances (usually humorous in nature) in most of the recent Marvel films. I appreciated that he always seemed to be having fun and loved what he was doing. He didn’t take himself too seriously, but he was serious about his work.

An editor friend of mine sent me an article with some quotes from Stan. It seemed like a good final word from the man himself and a great representation of his outlook on life. Most of his advice could be applied to any creative field.

I hope you enjoy these 17 nuggets of wisdom from Mr. Excelsior himself.

17 Must-Read Screenwriting Lessons From Stan Lee

As You Were Saying

Here’s some exciting news: I just launched a podcast with a friend of mine, Gordon Burroughs.

Just in case you couldn’t tell from the title and image, the name of the podcast is:

As You Were Saying

And you can click the name above to find it in iTunes.

Throughout the show, Gordon and I will discuss a wide range of topics including, but not limited to, culture, technology, entertainment, and faith. We also have a jolly good time responding to feedback and surprising one another with ridiculous questions. You can listen to the introductory episode 0 if you’d like to find out more.

Creating the podcast has been a learning experience to be sure. We recorded three (or was it four?) practice episodes and have experimented with a few different software and hardware setups. Our first attempt at an official episode went, how shall I say it, a bit sideways. So we canned it and tried again.

But now we’re up and rolling. It’s been a growing experience. I’m learning to be less self-conscious about everything I say and worry less about how my voice sounds (it seems way better in my head than on the recording).

The podcast isn’t specifically about creativity, though it is certainly one of my creative endeavors, and a fun one at that. It’s actually being hosted from this site and, for the time being, you can find it right here.

I’m looking forward to finding out where it goes from here and hope you give it a listen and maybe even a review.

success secrets

It’s not hard to find a ten-step list leading to almost guaranteed success in just about any field. While these lists don’t always have exactly ten steps, they’re pretty common nowadays.

I’ll admit, they can be helpful in breaking down an otherwise complicated process to its bare essentials, but such guides often do not lead to the success they promise—at least not immediately.

Here’s the problem: there usually isn’t just one formula that works all the time for everyone. Otherwise we’d all be rich, famous, bestselling authors with amazing six-pack abs.

There are just too many factors and too many complications to know for sure that the same course of action will yield predictable results for everyone.

Like it or not, most of our long-term goals will take a good amount of time and dedicated effort. Those promised shortcuts may exist, but they’re few and far between.

That said, I got a lot out of this article from Paul Kilduff-Taylor on The 10 Secrets to Indie Game Success (and Why They Do Not Exist)

Even though I’m not an indie game designer, I discovered some great insights that could be applied to creative design in general.

To entice you, here are a couple quotes from the article that I quite liked:

Your sojourn on this plane of reality is incredibly short and your perception of time accelerates as you get older — you will not have the hours, or the mental space, to work on everything that matters to you in your lifetime. If you can, spend your time creating a legacy that you will be proud of. 

 

Confidence, rather than arrogance, comes from being able to see the true value in yourself and in your work. You can be polite and humble but still have high self-confidence: in fact, these traits often go hand in hand. You do not have to become an all-singing all-dancing extrovert, but if you have issues in this area then you do owe it to yourself and others to work on them: the rewards will extend well beyond game development.

Death Cloud

In case you haven't noticed, I like to share other creative projects from time to time, usually ones completed by friends of mine.

This week, I present the super ominous, super cool Death Cloud. It's a novel by my buddy RJ Batla from his Senturians of Terraunum fantasy series.

He's trying something new this time and running a Kickstarter campaign. Naturally, I've backed it.

If you're interested, you can check it out right here!

 

And hey, if you've got some cool creative project you're ready to share with the world, let me know about it. You never know, I might just check it out and post something.